abundancypartners.co.uk DNS,DNS servers,DNS zone DNS record types: 5 Most Popular Examples

DNS record types: 5 Most Popular Examples

In this article we will take a closer look at the 5 most popular DNS record types. DNS records are text instructions. The computers need them to associate the domain names with their corresponding IP addresses.

A record

The first one from our list is the A record or also known as Address record. It’s definitely the most well-known DNS record type. We use A record to direct or point a hostname to its IP address. When we talk about it, we’re talking about IPv4 addresses (32-bit). And a newer AAAA record type that uses IPv6 addresses (128-bit).

As a result, your site’s A record will include the domain name/host (example.com), as well as the host’s location (IPv4 address), type (A), and TTL (time to live). It’s the most often utilized DNS record.

SOA record

The second one is the Start Of Authority record or SOA record for short. It is the one that is critical to understand. Why? Because it depicts the Start of the Authoritative DNS zone. This DNS record offers a lot of helpful information for the DNS zone. This DNS record is necessary if you want your network to function smoothly and without problems. It directs traffic to the primary DNS server. The DNS administrator’s information and contact information are stored in the SOA record and details related to zone transfers. It also contains a number of parameters, such as the domain serial number. It’s important to note that each DNS zone should only have one SOA record.

PTR record

The PTR record is the following one. You can frequently find it as a Pointer record. We use it to execute backchecks and to reverse the A record. What is the mechanism behind it? It links a hostname to a specific IP address (IPv4 or IPv6). We need it because the rest of the world’s servers may request verification that an IP address matches a hostname before accepting a service, communicating, or doing anything else. As a result, we routinely employ it in host authentication.

MX record

The MX record, which stands for Mail Exchanger record, is another critical DNS record type. Its purpose is to direct the receiving email server for a given domain name in the proper path. It contains the domain name that points to the incoming mail server’s hostname. We should also note that it must point to a hostname rather than an IP address.

In case of failure, you can generate a backup by setting up numerous MX records with different priorities. It is critical that you are able to receive emails accurately.

CNAME record

The CNAME record is the last DNS record type on our list. Its goal is to identify which subdomain or domain name is the canonical one. For subdomains, we commonly use CNAME records. As a result, DNS administration becomes a lot easier. All of your subdomains will be affected by any changes you make to your domain name. It would be helpful if you just used a CNAME record to point your subdomains to the domain name.

Conclusion

Now you are familiar with the 5 most popular DNS record types – A record, SOA record, PTR record, MX record, and CNAME record. So go ahead and put them into action. Best of luck!

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