Private DNS server – Everything you need to knowPrivate DNS server – Everything you need to know

The use of a Private DNS server is extremely useful. Today, we’ll look at why it’s important and how to put it into practice. But first, let’s go through what it’s all about.

Private DNS server: What does it mean?

As the name implies, a Private DNS server appears to be something personal. It serves as a conduit between your network and the Domain Name System server, preventing data from being intercepted. It’s a DNS network that isn’t connected to the public DNS. Consider it a little private library with a small book collection. This has both benefits and drawbacks. Yes, certain types of books will be unavailable to you. However, there is one advantage: no one will know what you are reading because your library is private.

Check out amazing Private DNS server solution for your organization!

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Knot DNS vs BIND vs PowerDNS: Key DifferencesKnot DNS vs BIND vs PowerDNS: Key Differences

When it comes to DNS (Domain Name System) servers, three names often come up as top contenders: Knot DNS, BIND, and PowerDNS. Each of these DNS servers offers unique features and capabilities, catering to different needs and preferences. This blog post will delve into the key differences between Knot DNS vs BIND vs PowerDNS, helping you decide which one might be the best fit for your needs.

Overview of Knot DNS vs BIND vs PowerDNS

Knot DNS

Knot DNS, developed by CZ.NIC, is a high-performance authoritative DNS server. It is designed with a focus on performance, scalability, and security. Knot DNS is particularly well-suited for large-scale deployments and is known for its high query performance and advanced DNS features.

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Get familiar with Round Robin DNSGet familiar with Round Robin DNS

In the vast and ever-evolving realm of the internet, the efficient distribution of web traffic is crucial to maintaining optimal website performance. One of the techniques used to achieve this is Round Robin DNS, a simple yet effective load balancing method that has been utilized for years. In this article, we will dive into the world of Round Robin DNS, exploring its workings, benefits, limitations, and best practices.

What is Round Robin DNS?

Round Robin DNS is a load balancing technique that distributes incoming web traffic evenly across multiple servers by alternating the order of IP addresses returned in the DNS (Domain Name System) resolution process. When a user attempts to access a website, their computer first contacts a DNS resolver to translate the domain name (e.g., www.example.com) into an IP address (e.g., 203.0.113.1) so that it can locate the correct server to retrieve the web page. In Round Robin DNS, the DNS resolver provides a list of IP addresses associated with the domain, but the order of the addresses changes each time a DNS query is made.

What is Weighted Round Robin (WRR)?

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Ping Monitoring explained for beginnersPing Monitoring explained for beginners

One of the simplest and most widely used methods for keeping an eye on our network is called Ping monitoring. In this blog post, we’ll break down the concept behind it and explain its significance in straightforward terms so even beginners can grasp its importance. So, without any further ado, let’s start!

What is Ping?

Before we delve into Ping monitoring, let’s first understand what “ping” means in the context of networking. Ping is a network utility used to test the reachability of a device or a host on an Internet Protocol (IP) network. It measures the round-trip time it takes for a small data packet to travel from your computer or device to the target and back.

Think of it as a simple “hello” or “are you there” message that is sent from one device to another to check if the destination device is active and responsive. The response from the destination device indicates that the connection is active, and the round-trip time gives an idea of the network’s responsiveness.

Everything you need to know about ICMP Ping Monitoring service!

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What does DNS poisoning mean?What does DNS poisoning mean?

In the vast internet landscape, where we browse, shop, and communicate daily, a hidden threat lurks that can potentially compromise our digital safety: DNS poisoning. This strange term can have far-reaching consequences, impacting individuals and organisations. In this blog post, we’ll explore the concept of DNS poisoning, understand how it works, and discover practical ways to protect ourselves from this invisible menace.

Understanding DNS Poisoning

DNS poisoning, also known as DNS cache poisoning or DNS spoofing, is a malicious attack on the DNS system designed to mislead it and redirect users to fraudulent or harmful websites. In a typical DNS poisoning attack, the attacker corrupts the DNS cache of a server or a user’s computer, replacing legitimate IP address information with malicious ones.

Once the DNS cache is poisoned, users who attempt to access a particular website are unknowingly redirected to a rogue website, often designed to mimic the legitimate site. These malicious websites are commonly used to steal sensitive information, such as login credentials, credit card details, or personal data, leading to identity theft, financial loss, and potential damage to the reputation of individuals or businesses.

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Secondary DNS explained in detailSecondary DNS explained in detail

One essential component that plays a vital role in achieving insurance of the stability and performance of your website is Secondary DNS (Domain Name System). In this blog post, we will explain what it is, explore its importance, benefits, and how it can enhance the reliability and efficiency of your online presence.

What is Secondary DNS?

At its core, the Domain Name System (DNS) is responsible for translating human-readable domain names into machine-readable IP addresses, facilitating seamless communication on the internet. Secondary DNS refers to an additional DNS server that acts as a backup to the primary DNS server. It plays a crucial role in distributing DNS query loads, improving redundancy, and safeguarding against downtime caused by DNS-related issues.

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DNSSEC – Purpose & BenefitsDNSSEC – Purpose & Benefits

Introduction to DNSSEC: Definition & Overview

DNSSEC, or Domain Name System Security Extensions, is an Internet security protocol designed to protect the response received from a domain name system query. It is composed of a set of protocols and extensions which protect the integrity, authenticity, and availability of the data returned by a DNS server. DNSSEC requires that before a server returns a response, it first checks that the response’s associated signature is valid and that the response has been signed by the server responsible for the DNS zone. By doing so, it ensures the integrity of the response and eliminates the possibility of malicious third-party interference. Additionally, Domain Name System Security Extensions can also be used to authenticate responses, allowing for the verifiable validation of the originator of the response. In summary, it is an important protocol that ensures the validity and secure transfer of DNS activity.

What is DS record and why do you need it?

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DNS Hosting Provider: How to Choose the Best for You?DNS Hosting Provider: How to Choose the Best for You?

If you’re launching a website or application, it’s important to choose a reliable DNS hosting provider. DNS (Domain Name System) is responsible for mapping your domain name to an IP address, ensuring that your website or application is accessible to users around the world. But how do you choose the best provider for your needs? In this blog post, we’ll explore what a DNS hosting provider is, why you should trust one, and factors to consider when choosing one.

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DNS record types: 5 Most Popular ExamplesDNS record types: 5 Most Popular Examples

In this article we will take a closer look at the 5 most popular DNS record types. DNS records are text instructions. The computers need them to associate the domain names with their corresponding IP addresses.

A record

The first one from our list is the A record or also known as Address record. It’s definitely the most well-known DNS record type. We use A record to direct or point a hostname to its IP address. When we talk about it, we’re talking about IPv4 addresses (32-bit). And a newer AAAA record type that uses IPv6 addresses (128-bit).

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Zone transfer explained in detailZone transfer explained in detail

Zone transfer: What is it?

Duplicating DNS records from the Primary DNS zone to the Secondary DNS zone is a procedure known as zone transfer. You can create several copies of your DNS records on other name servers in this manner. By executing the transfer, you will guarantee improved availability in the event that one of the name servers goes down. Additionally, if you run a global website with users from all over the world and different points of presence (PoPs), you will ensure faster DNS resolution.

What are Primary and Secondary DNS zones?

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